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Amalfi Coast

Overview

Internship

Internship #: TGMT 5900 Credits: 3-12

Internships are available during the Fall, Spring or Summer academic terms

For 3 credits (150 hours), 6 credits (236 hours), 9 credits (380 hours) or 12 credits (525 hours);
Academic credit for internships is transferable through SUNY Alfred (New York State), accredited by Middle States Commission on Higher Education;
Complete with 1-4 other academic courses including Italian language (all levels available);
**Note: Internship has an additional course fee of $400 USD, compulsory by Italian law to participate, valid from summer 2016 term.

Language: Most internships can be conducted in English, without a prior knowledge of the Italian language, however see individual fields and placements for language specifications.

Italian Studies

Pre-Intermediate Italian Language #: ITAL 1303 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

Italian 102 will establish the foundations of conversation and grammar. Students will work on basic grammar and speaking skills through conversation, dialogues, exercises and drills; develop vocabulary through reading, discussing and writing; and learn more about Italian culture through reading, video and presentations.

Intermediate Italian Language Course #: ITAL 3303 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

This course is designed for students who wish to develop the skills necessary to interact in the language and learn about Italian contemporary culture and society as well as Italy’s history. Students will continue to refine their speaking skills by completing tasks with your classmates in pairs and small groups and by following models of native speakers presented on video. Students will develop reading and writing skills by reading increasingly more elaborate authentic texts and writing related, reaction essays, and your listening skills will be cultivated by completing on-line listening activities, viewing and analyzing short clips from Italian movies, and listening to short lectures on topics in Italian culture, society, and history, such as Pompeii, the contemporary demographic profile of Italy, the history of the language, and of the unification of Italy.

Upper-Intermediate Italian Language Course #: ITAL 4303 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

This course is designed for students who wish to develop the skills necessary to interact in the language and learn about Italian contemporary culture and society as well as Italy’s history. Students will continue to refine their speaking skills by completing tasks with your classmates in pairs and small groups. They will develop reading and writing skills by reading increasingly more elaborate authentic texts and writing essays, and their listening skills will be cultivated by in-class interactions, listening to short lectures on topics in Italian culture, listening to Italian music, and watching Italian movies.

Advanced Italian Language #: ITAL 5303 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

This course is designed for those who are near fluency in Italian, having studied at least two years.

Post-Advanced Italian Language #: ITAL 6303 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

Italian 106 aims to guide students to become aware of their personal learning style and strategies, and to support them in their independence. Students need to have completed 5 semesters of Italian language. The language acquisition process takes place and is reinforced through daily contact with the language and through an interactive computer component. The grammatical revision of the language emerges from the linguistic encounters in class, where language teaching is embedded in the socio-cultural context of contemporary Italy. The multimedia component reinforces, tests and contextualizes language learning done in the classroom and disregarded as an essential part of this course.

Medieval Italian Literature I #: ITAL 5333 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

Dante Alighieri is the most important Italian poet, the father of Italian language and the principle figure of Medieval Literature in Europe.

This course will examine Dante’s Divine Comedy and some other minor works of his (i.e.“Vita Nuova” and “Convivio”). The course aim is to allow students to examine his internationally renowned literary texts in their original language.

Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in ahistorical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all the exercises assigned daily.
*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Medieval Italian Literature II #: ITAL 5443 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

Students will study Italian literature from the 14th to the 16th Century.

Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Authors include Petrarch, Boccaccio, Ariosto, Tasso, Machiavelli, and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition.

Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language, as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Modern Italian Literature #: ITAL 5223 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

Students will study Italian literature from the 17th to 19th Century. Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language. Authors include G. Leopardi, U. Foscolo, A.Manzoni and others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all exercises assigned daily.

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language, as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Contemporary Italian Literature #: ITAL 5113 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

Students will study Italian literature of the Twentieth Century.

Students will critically analyze the internationally renowned literary texts in their original language.

Authors include Pirandello, Quasimodo, Ungaretti, Montaleand others. Students will read excerpts from these works and engage in a historical, literary and rhetorical analysis of texts while determining techniques of poetic composition. Students will also learn about the lives of authors and the historical context and how these affected the masterpieces studied. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. They are also expected to do all exercises assigned daily.

 

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language, as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Natural Sciences

Introduction to Geology #: GEOL 1133 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

This course aims to give an introduction to the science of geology.  In particular, the maintypes of rocks are analyzed with an emphasis on genetic processes and in relationship to plate tectonics theory.  This basic knowledge will provide a background to understand and study the main geological risks, such as volcanoes, earthquakes, floods and landslides.  Specific examples from the Apennines mountain chain and Campanian plain will be examined to contextualize these topics in the Italian environment.  In addition, a significant aim of this course is for students to gain a conscious relationship with the environment.  The Campania region is an ideal place for experiential learning via site visits, with the opportunity for students to witness a wide range of geological features.  The evaluation for the course will include midterm and final written exams, a presentation and graphical exercises.

 

*Students must have earned at least 12 credits of Italian language, as the course will be instructed in Italian.

Introduction to Marine Biology #: BIOL 1133 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

This course focuses on the biology of organisms residing in the sea, from the diversity of planktonic communities to marine mega fauna, taking into consideration the ecological principles that govern marine life. The course aims to provide a solid educational background in basic and applied marine biology. Emphasis will be placed on marine environment issues and the adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms of organisms that allow them to occupy marine habitats. In particular, the Mediterranean Sea will play a central role in the course subjects, profiting from the availability of unique ecosystems and a nearby renowned marine research institute to conduct thematic field trips and practical tutorials.

 

 

Introduction to Volcanology #: GEOL 1233 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

The course is an introduction to the main elements of geological sciences including stratigraphy laws, the main types of rocks, and an understanding of faults and folds. These elements will be used to understand Plate Tectonics theory. Using this theory, different kinds of volcanoes will be analyzed, examining different magmatic compositions, igneous and pyroclastic rocks and their geodynamic environments. The role of geologic and geomorphologic processes will be analyzed in reference to volcanic risk. This course will also study landslides in volcanic soils (the case of Sarno mounts) and groundwater flow in volcanic aquifers and exploitation of thermal waters (the case of Ischia).

 

 

Social Sciences

History of Contemporary Italy #: HIST 1223 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

In this course, students will examine Italian history beginning with the end of World War II and the birth of the Italian Republic. The clashes between various political parties, the Cold War, the economic boom and terrorism in the 1970s will be analyzed. Students will later examine the political degeneration of the 80s, “Tangentopoli” and the new political system in the Berlusconi era. Particular attention will be devoted to foreign policy, focusing on Italy’s role in the international arena with emphasis on the European unification process with Italy as a leading country. The faculty will generate a critical discussion on these topics inviting students to think independently about the causes and consequences of the events that they study. Students are expected to actively participate and contribute to class discussion. Evaluation will include two written exams and one 5-page research paper.

 

 

History of the Mafia: Origins and International Scope #: HIST 1123 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

The course examines the history of the Mafia from its origins to the present day. How the Mafia works and has succeeded as well as approaches to combating the Mafia are also examined, including the reaction of civil society organizations. Attention is paid to examples of Mafia enterprises, its past and present role in politics, and its evolution from a regional organization to one with an international reach. The class also examines the ethics of the Mafia actions throughout time. A research project, with both a paper and an oral presentation, is required.

 

 

Western Civilization Since 1648 #: HIST 1113 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

This course provides an introduction to the political, intellectual, cultural, and economic features of Western civilization from the early modern period to the mid-twentieth century. The topics covered will include the roots of Western Civilization, Enlightenment, French Revolution and Napoleon, Industrial Revolution, Liberalism, Romanticism, Nationalism, Socialism, Imperialism, the First World War, Totalitarianism, World War II, post-War Europe, the rise of Western feminism, post modernism and the current communications revolution, and globalization trends.

 

 

Arts and Humanities

Archaeology: Cities of Fire #: ANTH 5223 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

Archaeology studies past cultures and societies through their material remains. This course provides a basic introduction to the discipline, focusing on the study of some major Roman cities destroyed by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. The program combines the archaeological study with the analysis of the historical, economic and social aspects of the Roman culture of the era. Students participate in several site visits to examine the remains and reconstruction of the ancient cities.

 

 

Creative Writing: Travel and Experience #: LITR 3133 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

This course will introduce students to the process and techniques of creative writing (focusing on travel experience). Students will experiment with various types of writing, including the writing of fiction and poetry. Class readings will expose students to various writing styles in British and American literature and provide examples of the successes and strategies of other writers. Class time will be spent discussing the writer’s craft, the assigned readings, and student writing.

 

 

Survey of Art History: Ancient Greek to Italian Baroque #: FNAT 1133 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

Art is the highest expression of a culture. Political, historical and social changes lie at the heart of art. Works of art are the reflection of the ages in which they are produced and are often used as a “tool” to carry messages. During our classes we will focus on the study of the development of art during the centuries and how it affects today’s artists. We will have a brief review of the main artistic movements starting from the ancient Greek reaching Italy’s Baroque period.

 

 

Drawing on Location, the Art of the Travel Sketchbook #: FNAT 2453 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

This course is offered to students enrolled at Sant’Anna Institute as part of the study abroad program in Sorrento, Italy. Lectures and field sketching sessions are centered on drawing on location as the best way weave to increase our capacity to observe and to understand reality. An object, a tree, a person, cities or landscapes: during every day life or while traveling, journaling and sketching from real is a profound and lasting experience. While drawing we learn to see and we can select information and highlight details better than we could with a camera. Students will discover Sorrento and its region of Campania, visiting Naples and surrounding archaeological sites, recording their observations through images and words in a travel sketchbook. Freehand drawing and location drawing as basic and complementary skills are recommended not only among architects, visual artists, animators and graphic designers, but also in disciplines such as archaeology, history, zoology, botany and geology. Classic drawing exercises, as suggested by authors such as Kimon Nicolaides or Betty Edwards, will also help beginners to break the ice with life drawing and get the most out of the experience.

 

 

Introduction to Digital Photography #: FNAT 2553 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

Introduction to Digital Photography gives students fundamental skills for effectively recording travel, home, and work experiences. Using digital photography as a tool, students are encouraged to become more careful observers of the people, the landscape, the art, the architecture, and the culture that they encounter in their daily lives. The course concentrates on technical lectures and lab/studio time regarding the basic operation of a digital camera and the processing of images. Students develop an understanding of the elements that combine to create powerful visual images: subject matter, composition, color, and light. Through selected readings, assignments, lab/studio time, and critiques, students produce a written and visual final project for the course. Students are responsible for providing their own cameras, supplies, and image editing software.

History of Italian Cinema #: FILM 3113 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

This course is designed for film lovers or film students to help them to have a deep and thorough knowledge of this art form and all its expressions and revolutions in Italy from the WWII to its current status. Studying Italian cinema helps to capture the changes that occurred in Italy in the past decades, such as political, social, and economical transformations that have taken place. The course also examines Italian cinema from an aesthetic standpoint, the iconographic and technical developments of the ‘new’ medium. Students express their opinions and make their own criticisms and written assignments.

Business

Business in the European Union #: BUAD 6213 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

This course is intended to provide the student with a comprehensive introduction to business in the European Union. The course describes how economic, political and social factors interrelate, and influence business in Europe. Students will use a framework to research sustainable business practices from different European Union member state’s perspective. Guest lecturers and field trips are planned for students enrolled in the study abroad program.

Territory and Entrepreneurship: Tradition, Sustainability and Competition #: ECON 5133 Credits: 3 (45 contact hours)

The course aims to analyze the relationship between sustainability, economy, quality and globalization. It will also focus on the European Union and sustainable development. Other included topics will be: the food industry in Italy (focusing on the Campania region), organic farming in Italy, “local food, local market, local business” and sustainable tourism in Italy.

International Tourism: Italian Food and Geography #: BUAD 3114 Credits: 4 (60 contact hours)

The course presents concepts of tourism relating to food and geography, using Italy as its example. The course is relevant to students of all backgrounds but was designed specifically for students of hospitality, business, and culinary arts. Students will study international organizations operating in tourism (i.e. WTO) and the different types of tourism, with particular attention paid to sustainable tourism.

Students will be asked to investigate the tourism geography of Italy, becoming familiar with the most important tourist sites in Italy and Campania (through several excursions). The third module of the course will be dedicated to a very important kind of tourism in Italy and of the Campania: Food and Wine Tourism.