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Florence

Overview

Dates: August 30 – December 20, 2018

Program Fee: TBA

 

Application Deadline:

May 1, 2018

Fine Arts

Discovering Florence Through Photography #: ART 214 Credits: 3

Course Description: This course is designed to teach the fundamental skills and basic techniques of shooting color and black and white images with digital cameras. Special emphasis will be placed upon aesthetic and visual concerns as well as presentation and craftsmanship. The course focuses upon understanding and operation of the camera, manual exposure, composition, history of photography, and image correction through Adobe Photoshop. Advanced students who already have a strong foundation in basic digital photography will be introduced to advanced techniques of photo editing through Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom software. By the end of the course students will have developed an understanding of their own photographic language and have acquired a more critical eye.

Drawing in the Expanded Field #: ART 316 Credits: 3

Drawing in the expanded field is a studio art course that focuses on exploring contemporary drawing across a wide range of subjects and media.  Students will initially look closely at ideas pertaining to the pictorial and conceptual nature of the subject of drawing as a means to record, communicate and discover through mark making in wet and dry media.  As the course progresses, students will study artists working with drawing in media other than traditional materials. Alternative ways of drawing will be explored through the use of video, assemblage, on-site interventions and digital technology. The course concludes with a focus on what it means to measure one’s own abilities in relation to what is being made by today’s most influential international artists.  Students will, therefore, be required to make final projects that have a clear sense of what it means to make contemporary drawings – intentionally done in a medium that best fits their endeavor – for exhibition purposes.

Renaissance Painting Techniques #: ART 313 Credits: 3

A Florentine experience for both studio artists and art historians.
Many contemporary artists use methods that were developed during the Renaissance because of the richness and flexibility of such techniques and art historians have an obvious interest in knowing specifically how the materials were used to create the masterpieces of Florentine painting. This course is intended for both groups and does not rely on previous painting experience, though that is helpful.
The course provides extensive experience with a range of the traditional materials and methods that were used in the masterpieces produced in Italy throughout the Renaissance. Hands-on demonstrations, lectures and on-site field trips will inform both artists and art historians. The focus will be on the exploration of the distinctive luminosity and translucent characteristic of egg tempera and tempera grassa painting.
The source material for student works will include using photographs taken by the students of Florentine masterpieces, as well as art historical reproductions. In the studio students will learn the processes for making handmade gypsum or chalk gesso panels, preliminary drawings, transfers, silverpoint drawings, a variety of value and color glazing techniques, egg tempera paints mixed from dry pigments, tempera grassa (oil emulsion), and applying gold leaf.
The world-class museums within walking distance of the Santa Reparata studios create a unique opportunity for group discussion and personal artistic research from actual Renaissance paintings.

Printmaking: Expanding the Matrix #: ART 325 Credits: 3

This course will explore a merging of traditional and non-traditional printmaking media as it may be utilized in an expansive contemporary art arena.  The class will introduce an array of techniques such techniques as woodcut and collagraph, to digitally generated print media, such as solar and polyester plates. Students will be instructed on how to achieve textural and hand-drawn elements, with a variety of multiple-color and multiple-image layering techniques that offer the potential to explore serial imaging and multi-media approaches. The collagraph will be incorporated both as an image making process on its own, as well as a means to produce multiple color layers in conjunction with the other techniques introduced during the course. The end result of the course will focus on the possibilities present for creating work that evidences an expanded contemporary and conceptual vocabulary, while acknowledging the vitality and applicability of traditional media.  This course is intended for students at both the beginning, intermediate and advanced levels, though projects and learning outcomes will differ for students requesting intermediate or advanced printmaking credit.

Design

Fashion Design Studio: Illustration & Construction #: ART 373 Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the basic techniques of fashion design used in both illustration and construction including drawing, draping and sewing while focusing on personal creativity. Students will learn how create fashion collections following their own fashion project development from the idea to the actual execution and presentation of the project. Technical skills such as sketching a fashion figure, sketching garments and how they fall on the body will be addressed along with how to use colouring media, such as markers, colour pencils, collage techniques etc., and how to organize a fashion collection. Field trips to museums like the Costume Gallery at the Pitti Palace and the Ferragamo Museum as well fashion/art exhibitions will be an important source of inspiration to develop personal projects.

Topics in Fashion Design: The Italian Fashion Industry #: ART 260 Credits: 3

Using the Italian fashion industry as a model, students are introduced to the different workings and interrelationships of various industries and services that compose the fashion business. From textiles design and accessories to haut-couture and prêt-a-porter, students will explore the many aspects of the Italian fashion industry. Visits to design studios, fashion exhibits and textile factories introduce students to the industry first hand. The course looks at how trends are evaluated, fabrics are selected and final products find their way from the drawing board to the runway and clothing racks.

Liberal Arts

Art History: The Italian Renaissance #: ARTH 370 Credits: 3

This lecture course introduces students to Florentine Renaissance art from the early 15th century to the end of the High Renaissance in 1527. Students will study key practitioners of this period and their contributions to art history such as mathematical perspective, the rediscovery of the classical elements found in architecture and sculpture as well as the relentless search by certain artists for the perfection of balance and harmony. Renaissance artists such as Masaccio, Sandro Botticelli, Lorenzo Ghiberti, Donatello and Filippo Brunelleschi along with artists working in the High Renaissance style of the late 15th and early 16th centuries like Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo Buonarroti and Raphael of Urbino will be studied. In addition to the aesthetic and stylistic qualities of the works, students will study the historical, political, and religious context in which the artists made their work as a means to allow for a greater understanding of the works themselves.

Michelangelo, Caravaggio, and Bernini #: ADAH 297 Credits: 3

The course will focus on major artistic movements from Michelangelo to Caravaggio and Bernini. We will begin by analyzing Michelangelo Buonarroti as an architect, painter and sculptor who served as a foundation and model for following generations and as a figure in art history who is most closely associated with the “High Renaissance.” The course will examine his exemplary artistic creations that paved the way to a period that is vaguely circumscribed by the term “Baroque”.
We will then focus on Michelangelo da Merisi, known as Caravaggio, and on issues of severe criticism and problems in his troubled life, and the tremendous influence this artist exerted on the art of Europe. Our studies will then take us to Gian Lorenzo Bernini, who is synonymous with Baroque. The course will examine his artistic life as a sculptor and architect who found compelling and outstanding visual embodiment for the aspirations of Roman Counter-Reformation and the idea of triumphant Catholicism as well as secular absolutism.

The Great Patrons of Florence #: TBA Credits: 3

This course addresses the rise of great patrons of the arts in Florence, whether members of powerful banking families, the nobility, the Church, or confraternities.  These social leaders influenced not only the visual culture of the Florentine landscape, but also the broader European Renaissance.  Students will learn about the artists, architects, philosophers and patrons behind Florentine palace culture and art of the public sphere through works of art by Botticelli, Brunelleschi, Ghiberti, Michelangelo, Donatello, and others.
Through studying primary documentation (in translation), and examining the commission of artworks from a viewpoint of visual, social and economic history, students will better understand the influences on the Florentine art market and gain insights into contemporary art patronage.

Italian Language, Food and Culture #: ITAL 101 + INTD 103 Credits: 6

In this team taught course students will explore the Italian food culture in an immersive Italian language class.  Through the lens of food, students will learn beginning Italian language conversation.  The students will go on-site to visit markets to learn about the products and speak with vendors while practicing Italian. Students will partake in cooking classes; visits to local makers of wine, olive oil, chocolate, gelato, and cheese for tastings; learn about and experience the Aperitivo culture; and use the Italian language as the way to get closer to Italian people and traditions.  Additionally, cultural context to Italian lifestyle will be provided through topics such as Italian Cinema, Fashion, the “dolce vita”, Italy and the art of living.

The image of Italy in the world is tightly connected with the global diffusion and promotion of its leading “Made in Italy” products, among which food and wines are the most important. Italy has become the land of class and style, Italian chefs are as popular as Italian fashion designers, Italian wines feature among the best wines of the world, and Italian recipes have found their way to the world’s most renowned restaurants’ menus. The course will examine the links between festivals, food, wines, tourism and the contemporary Italian economy and will give students the opportunity to discover the reasons for this miracle through learning Italian while learning how to cook and to enjoy life Italian Style.

The goal of the course is to obtain a basic but solid understanding of the Italian language and Food Culture through listening, speaking reading and writing. The student will be immersed in the Italian language from the very first day of class and will be using the language to shop at the markets, to write recipes, and to connect with Italians.

Note: This is a 6 credit, 90 contact hour course and cannot be taken in conjunction with another course.  The credits are divided as such: 3 credits of Italian Language, 3 credits of Food and Culture.

History of Modern Italy #: HIST 343 Credits: 3

This course will study the history of Modern Italy from the Risorgimento and continue on through the development and decline of the liberal Italian state, Mussolini and Italian Fascism, World War II and post World War II Italy up through recent historical events.
Introduction to major literary, cinematographic and artistic movements are covered as well as social aspects of Italian life including topics such as the Italian political system, the development of the Italian educational system, the roots and influence of the Italian Mafia and the changing role of the woman in Italian society.
This course introduces students to the history and politics of modern Italy from the time of its political Risorgimento (unification) to the present. The major topics covered throughout the course include the process of political unification in the mid-late 1800s, the birth and growth of Fascism in Italy (1922-1943), the Second World War (1940-45), the workings of governing institutions in the post-war period (1946-48), the role of the Church, political parties and movements, the process of massive industrialization (1950-60’s), political terrorist events (1960-80’s) as well as political corruption and political conspiracy.
There will also be an in-depth analysis of the political crisis and transformation of the Italian democratic system in the early 1990s.

The course is particularly recommended to all those students that want to gain an in-depth knowledge of the contemporary social and political history of Italy.

The Economic History of Europe #: ECON 497Credits: 3

Starting from pre-industrial Europe, this course will explore the continental history through its economy and the complexity of all the implication that it had on the European society, the human relationships and the political institutions. United Europe was born mostly as an economic super-national organism in order to cancel all the custom tolls and start a common collaboration by European countries severely damaged after WWII. In 1952 the Community of Carbon and Steel came into force; in 1957 the Economic European Community was founded; in 1971 all the internal tolls were abolished and the European Community started earning from the imports of all those countries outside the Community itself. In 2002, finally, the European Union could present to the world its unique currency, the Euro.

Migration in the Italian Visual Cultural Imaginary #: TBA Credits: 3

Beginning in the 1980s, Italy, a country traditionally known as a nation of emigration, became a nation of immigration, with migrants arriving from parts of Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. With the arrival of migrants from the former Soviet bloc and former Western colonial territories, Italy’s transformation into a new multicultural and multiracial society becomes evident in its cinema. In this course, students will examine Italy’s transformation from emigrant to immigrant nation through film. Through selected readings, screenings and assignments, students will learn how migration is represented in the Italian cultural imaginary. Specifically, students will learn how the cinema mediates our understanding of migration today, and contributes to dialogues concerning cultural hybridity, citizenship, and national belonging.

Students will learn the historical contexts for understanding contemporary migration to and within Italy (national unification, Fascist imperialism, postwar decolonization, postwar internal migration, postcolonialism). Students will also study the representation of migration in various cinematic modes (narrative, documentary, experimental). By the end of the course, students will understand the central debates surrounding contemporary immigration to Italy. Students will also be able to analyze films both in terms of form and genre, but also within their social, historical, and cultural contexts. While this course focuses on film, we will examine migration in the broader Italian visual culture, looking at political art, advertising campaigns and mass demonstrations and movements surrounding migration debates.

Italian Language

Italian I #: ITAL 101 Credits: 4

This is an entry level Italian language course designed for students who have never studied the language before.  The goal of the course is to obtain a basic but solid understanding of the Italian language through listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Upon completion of this course students should have the basic communications skills needed for day-to-day activities.

Italian II #: ITAL 102 Credits: 4

This is a second level Italian language course for students who have a basic knowledge of the Italian language. This course builds on grammar and conversation topics introduced in the beginning level Italian class offered at SRISA. In addition to developing listening, reading and writing skills students will be introduced to the Italian culture through conversation topics including Italian literature, politics, current events, social customs, and music.

Italian Language, Food and Culture #: ITAL 101 + INTD 103 Credits: 6

In this team taught course students will explore the Italian food culture in an immersive Italian language class.  Through the lens of food, students will learn beginning Italian language conversation.  The students will go on-site to visit markets to learn about the products and speak with vendors while practicing Italian. Students will partake in cooking classes; visits to local makers of wine, olive oil, chocolate, gelato, and cheese for tastings; learn about and experience the Aperitivo culture; and use the Italian language as the way to get closer to Italian people and traditions.  Additionally, cultural context to Italian lifestyle will be provided through topics such as Italian Cinema, Fashion, the “dolce vita”, Italy and the art of living.

The image of Italy in the world is tightly connected with the global diffusion and promotion of its leading “Made in Italy” products, among which food and wines are the most important. Italy has become the land of class and style, Italian chefs are as popular as Italian fashion designers, Italian wines feature among the best wines of the world, and Italian recipes have found their way to the world’s most renowned restaurants’ menus. The course will examine the links between festivals, food, wines, tourism and the contemporary Italian economy and will give students the opportunity to discover the reasons for this miracle through learning Italian while learning how to cook and to enjoy life Italian Style.

The goal of the course is to obtain a basic but solid understanding of the Italian language and Food Culture through listening, speaking reading and writing. The student will be immersed in the Italian language from the very first day of class and will be using the language to shop at the markets, to write recipes, and to connect with Italians.

Note: This is a 6 credit, 90 contact hour course and cannot be taken in conjunction with another course.  The credits are divided as such: 3 credits of Italian Language, 3 credits of Food and Culture.